Words Have the Power to…Question

Words are the most powerful tool individuals have to question and change the status quo. Don’t let a day go by without using your words to make education equality a reality. It’s easier than you think. Subscribe to the blog, and share this week’s post to raise awareness about the word gap.

SPREAD THE WORD
This week’s shocking statistic:

In low-income school districts, there are 3 times the number of teachers not qualified to teach their subject-area than in wealthier schools. Studies show struggling readers learn because of good teachers, while strong readers learn in spite of bad teachers. Parents have the power to send their children to school as strong readers who succeed no matter who their teachers are.

Use your words to close the achievement gap before it starts:www.wordrebel.org 

WORD OF THE WEEK
Build your own vocabulary with these uncommon words:

PANDICULATE: Yawning and stretching in public.

WORDS HAVE POWER
Some quotes to live by:

“Ask how you’d live your life differently if you knew you were going to die soon, then ask yourself who those people you admire are and why you admire them, and then ask yourself what was the most fun time in your life. The answers to these questions, when seen, heard, and felt, provide us with an open doorway into our mission, our destiny, our purpose.”
– Thom Hartmann

ACTIVITY UPDATE

Thanks to generous donors, the parents and children at our day care partnerships have a reason to celebrate. Tonight, Bellevue Educare Childcare Center is distributing over $300 worth of hard cover books at their family holiday party! This is just the beginning as parents will receive 100+ downloadable books via email in 2015!

PARENT CORNER

SUBSCRIBE to receive one free downloadable book a week.

READ “GO, DOG, GO” 
by P.D. Eastman 
 for FREE  in a corner of your local bookstore or library

READ “CHICO THE BRAVE” for FREE online (simply sign up for wegivebooks.org).

BUILD VOCABULARY: Ask your child questions about what they have done, are doing, or plan to do. Pay attention to the words they use. Help them form more specific answers by suggesting words they don’t know yet.

READ FOR A PURPOSE: Ask the questions teachers will ask, “How is the main character described in your story?  Describe their personality and physical traits.When and where does the story takes place? Do you know the date, the time of day, the place, etc.?
”

promise

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